December 9, 2022
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Travis Scott’s foundation funds scholarships for students | Entertainment

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Travis Scott’s foundation has awarded $1 million in scholarships for students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

The Cactus Jack Foundation has awarded the money to 100 members of the graduating class of 2022, with $10,000 scholarships being given to seniors who have reached academic excellence while facing financial adversity.

Travis, 31 – who has Stormi, four, and a three-month-old son with Kylie Jenner – said: “Excellence abounds in every black household, but too often opportunity does not – and black students are left behind or counted out. So that’s what my family and I set out to change.

“We congratulate all 100 scholarship recipients this year. I know we will see great things from them – and we are already looking forward to increasing our work next year.”

The Cactus Jack Foundation was founded to enrich the lives of young people by providing access to education and creative resources.

Jordan Webster – the project manager for the Cactus Jack Foundation’s Waymon Webster Scholarship Fund and Travis’ sister – feels proud of the foundation and what it’s already been able to achieve.

Jordan said: “Last week, I received my own diploma from Howard University. I know personally how deeply important my grandfather’s academic legacy at HBCUs is to my entire family – to Travis, as well as my twin brother Josh who is at Prairie View A M University – and now, to 100 people that Travis has been able to help out at a tough time.

“It means the world to me to be able to work with my brother as he creates hope and makes a real difference for our peers and their families.”



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