January 28, 2023
Trending Tags

Section of Greensboro I-840 Urban Loop to open; will help traffic

Read Time:6 Minute, 18 Second

The Greensboro Urban Loop project is set to open on Monday, which leaders said will help with traffic and nearby small businesses.URBAN-LOOP PROJECT:WXII 12 News talked with Wright Archer, division engineer with the North Carolina Department of Transportation, on Friday.The final four-mile stretch of the 49-mile loop on Interstate 840 cost around $150 million to build, he said.The last section is from North Elm Street to U.S. 29.The planning for the entire project began in 1969, and construction began in 1999.”That’s all part of the planning,” he said. “It’s one reason it takes so long because we want to minimize the impacts to the public and the residents.”The project included 10 million cubic yards worth of work.”That puts us again to the curve or trying to get ahead of that growth curve that we see to keep folks being able to get around the area — folks, goods and services. If we lessen that travel time, that’s less time off of your life,” Archer said. “That’s less fuel you’re spending. That’s obviously an economic bonus. It’s better for the environment. Less fuel we burn. Less emissions. That’s what we look at all holistically in this project.”Archer said a ceremony will be held at the interstate on Monday at 11 a.m. It should open up to drivers beginning at 2 p.m.”This is our part to stay ahead of that curve as we grow, from a residential side and an industrial commercial side. To stay ahead of the curve to maintain that 20-minute or less drive around town,” he said.SMALL BUSINESSES: WXII 12 News talked with small businesses at both ends of the project to understand how the opening would possibly impact the area.Devon Combs, shift manager at Duck Donuts on Pisgah Church Road, said her small business has been navigating the economic challenges many industries faced throughout the past few years, including high inflation, supply chain issues, staffing shortages, etc.”It’s a little frustrating because sometimes with things going up, we have to focus on the business aspect of things and making sure we can get in what we need, and put out supply for our customers so they can come in and get what they want,” she said.She said the opening of the last section of the Urban Loop is giving her and many other nearby businesses hope.”Super excited because I knew it was going to bring in a lot of foot traffic, and it was going to bring in more customers,” she said.WXII 12 News traveled to the opposite side of the project and visited Country Kitchen on Hicone Road.Mark Mahdi, lead cook, said the past few years have “been real tough for business. You have people who don’t want to come in. And people who come in, you got to keep appeasing them. It’s been rough.”But the last section of the Urban Loop project will bring more traffic to this area, and Mahdi hopes that can support his business.”Honestly, with the construction that was going on, that stopped a lot of traffic flow this way. People having to go around. Now that it’s here, everybody can come straight here,” he said. “I was excited. More business. More money. Everything comes back home.”He stressed, “Support your local businesses. Please.”

The Greensboro Urban Loop project is set to open on Monday, which leaders said will help with traffic and nearby small businesses.

URBAN-LOOP PROJECT:

WXII 12 News talked with Wright Archer, division engineer with the North Carolina Department of Transportation, on Friday.

The final four-mile stretch of the 49-mile loop on Interstate 840 cost around $150 million to build, he said.

The last section is from North Elm Street to U.S. 29.

The planning for the entire project began in 1969, and construction began in 1999.

“That’s all part of the planning,” he said. “It’s one reason it takes so long because we want to minimize the impacts to the public and the residents.”

The project included 10 million cubic yards worth of work.

“That puts us again to the curve or trying to get ahead of that growth curve that we see to keep folks being able to get around the area — folks, goods and services. If we lessen that travel time, that’s less time off of your life,” Archer said. “That’s less fuel you’re spending. That’s obviously an economic bonus. It’s better for the environment. Less fuel we burn. Less emissions. That’s what we look at all holistically in this project.”

Archer said a ceremony will be held at the interstate on Monday at 11 a.m.

It should open up to drivers beginning at 2 p.m.

“This is our part to stay ahead of that curve as we grow, from a residential side and an industrial commercial side. To stay ahead of the curve to maintain that 20-minute or less drive around town,” he said.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

SMALL BUSINESSES:

WXII 12 News talked with small businesses at both ends of the project to understand how the opening would possibly impact the area.

Devon Combs, shift manager at Duck Donuts on Pisgah Church Road, said her small business has been navigating the economic challenges many industries faced throughout the past few years, including high inflation, supply chain issues, staffing shortages, etc.

“It’s a little frustrating because sometimes with things going up, we have to focus on the business aspect of things and making sure we can get in what we need, and put out supply for our customers so they can come in and get what they want,” she said.

She said the opening of the last section of the Urban Loop is giving her and many other nearby businesses hope.

“Super excited because I knew it was going to bring in a lot of foot traffic, and it was going to bring in more customers,” she said.

WXII 12 News traveled to the opposite side of the project and visited Country Kitchen on Hicone Road.

Mark Mahdi, lead cook, said the past few years have “been real tough for business. You have people who don’t want to come in. And people who come in, you got to keep appeasing them. It’s been rough.”

But the last section of the Urban Loop project will bring more traffic to this area, and Mahdi hopes that can support his business.

“Honestly, with the construction that was going on, that stopped a lot of traffic flow this way. People having to go around. Now that it’s here, everybody can come straight here,” he said. “I was excited. More business. More money. Everything comes back home.”

He stressed, “Support your local businesses. Please.”





Source link

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Previous post Emilia Clarke in a So-So Satirical Sci-Fi – The Hollywood Reporter
Next post More than $300,000 raised by Tampa Bay sports stars for children