October 2, 2022

Sacked shadow minister praises Lisa Nandy for joining strikers on picket line – UK politics live | Politics

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Sacked shadow minister praises Lisa Nandy for joining strikers on picket line

Sam Tarry, the shadow transport minister sacked by Keir Starmer for comments made on a rail picket line, said it was “great to see” Lisa Nandy visiting striking communications workers today.

Tarry was sacked by Starmer last week for giving multiple interviews on a picket line at Euston in London with striking RMT workers – where he suggested they deserved pay rises in line with inflation.

Tarry tweeted:

Senior Labour politicians need to demonstrate loud and clear that our party is on the side of ordinary working people who are fighting back against this anti-worker government.

Great to see @lisanandy on the picket line.

Senior Labour politicians need to demonstrate loud and clear that our Party is on the side of ordinary working people who are fighting back against this anti-worker Government. 🌹 https://t.co/a553BF8Udg

— Sam Tarry MP (@SamTarry) August 1, 2022

Starmer has previously told shadow frontbenchers they should not join picket lines for strikes, arguing that Labour should be a party of government. Nandy is understood to have told the leader’s office in advance that she planned to visit Communication Workers Union (CWU) workers from BT and Openreach striking in her Wigan constituency.

Key events

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A new Ipsos poll shows Rishi Sunak and Keir Starmer tied amongst the public in terms of who would make the most capable prime minister.

Liz Truss trails Starmer by six points on the same measure – although all of them fare significantly better than Boris Johnson, according to the latest poll.

Sunak has a slight advantage amongst the public at large and among Conservative voters in terms of being seen as “having what it takes to be a good Prime Minister”, but Truss has reduced the gap among Tory supporters.

NEW Who would make most capable PM?
Johnson 31%
Starmer 51%

Sunak 39%
Starmer 39%

Truss 35%
Starmer 41%

Fieldwork July 21-27

NB no-one knows about how hypothetical leaders will actually perform until they are in office..

— Ben Page (@benatipsos) August 1, 2022

Meanwhile, Labour has increased its lead over the Conservative Party among the public.

NEW from @IpsosUK / @standardnews.

🚨Labour lead at 14 🚨

Lab 44 (+3)
Con 30 (nc)
Lib Dems 10 (-5)
Green 8 (+2)
Other 8 (nc)

Fieldwork July 21-27. Changes from June.

But there is a catch…

— Keiran Pedley (@keiranpedley) August 1, 2022

Boris Johnson has ruled out an extra bank holiday to celebrate the Lionesses’ victory in the Women’s Euro.

A No 10 spokesperson said there are “no plans” to add a new bank holiday but that the PM would back honours for the Lionesses.

The spokesperson said:

Obviously we all want to celebrate the Lionesses’ win, but there are no plans to change the current pattern of public bank holidays.

Jessica Elgot

Jessica Elgot

Told by two sources Nandy didn’t “get permission” from Loto to go and meet CWU workers – she told them in advance as a courtesy. Other shadow ministers interpreting essentially that if you go, and don’t go big on promoting yourself then it’s fine.

— Jessica Elgot (@jessicaelgot) August 1, 2022

Rory Carroll

Rory Carroll

David Trimble faced bitter opposition from across the political spectrum during his life but his funeral has united British, Irish and Northern Irish leaders in paying tribute to his accomplishments and sacrifice.

The service in Lisburn on Monday brought together the British prime minister, Boris Johnson, and other political representatives from London, Dublin and Belfast to bid farewell to Northern Ireland’s inaugural first minister.

Boris Johnson attends the funeral of David Trimble with Irish president Michael D Higgins, left, in Lisburn.
Boris Johnson attends the funeral of David Trimble with Irish president Michael D Higgins, left, in Lisburn. Photograph: Liam McBurney/PA

It was a rare gathering and show of solidarity – and a truce in current political tensions – to honour Lord Trimble, an architect of the 1998 Good Friday agreement and a former Ulster Unionist party (UUP) leader, who died last week aged 77.

Ireland’s president, Michael D Higgins, and taoiseach, Micheál Martin, joined Northern Ireland’s party leaders at Harmony Hill Presbyterian church, a name both apt and ironic given Trimble’s torrid time as a peacemaker.

Read the full article by my colleague Rory Carroll here:

Asked by reporters if Chris Pincher should resign his seat in the Commons, Rishi Sunak said he would quickly reappoint an independent adviser “to make sure that ministers and the government are held to account for their behaviour”.

Pincher has refused to resign as MP for Tamworth after he drunkenly groped two men at a private members’ club in London’s Piccadilly. He now represents the constituency as an independent after being suspended by the Conservative party.

Sunak said:

I think trust is really important and standards are really important in public life. I think honesty is important. And that’s why in this leadership campaign, even though it’s not easy for me, I want to be honest about some of the challenges we face and what’s going to be required to fix them.

Sacked shadow minister praises Lisa Nandy for joining strikers on picket line

Sam Tarry, the shadow transport minister sacked by Keir Starmer for comments made on a rail picket line, said it was “great to see” Lisa Nandy visiting striking communications workers today.

Tarry was sacked by Starmer last week for giving multiple interviews on a picket line at Euston in London with striking RMT workers – where he suggested they deserved pay rises in line with inflation.

Tarry tweeted:

Senior Labour politicians need to demonstrate loud and clear that our party is on the side of ordinary working people who are fighting back against this anti-worker government.

Great to see @lisanandy on the picket line.

Senior Labour politicians need to demonstrate loud and clear that our Party is on the side of ordinary working people who are fighting back against this anti-worker Government. 🌹 https://t.co/a553BF8Udg

— Sam Tarry MP (@SamTarry) August 1, 2022

Starmer has previously told shadow frontbenchers they should not join picket lines for strikes, arguing that Labour should be a party of government. Nandy is understood to have told the leader’s office in advance that she planned to visit Communication Workers Union (CWU) workers from BT and Openreach striking in her Wigan constituency.

Sunak also downplayed growing cabinet support for Liz Truss, telling reporters:

You have to remember that actually in the parliamentary stage of this contest I topped the ballot in each and every round, with more support from MPs than any other candidate.

He said “lots more people” have come on board to back him since the close of that ballot, adding:

So actually I feel very confident that there’s an enormous amount of support, in fact the most support in a parliamentary party, for my candidacy.

Rishi Sunak said his plan to cut income tax by 20% by the end of the decade was “one of the most far-reaching cuts to income tax that we’ve seen” and would be done “responsibly over time”.

The former chancellor told reporters in Devon that as prime minister, he would cut VAT on energy bills “to provide a little bit of extra help for people over the autumn and winter” as bills would be “higher than we thought”.

Sunak described his proposed plan to cut income tax to 16p by the end of the next parliament as “radical”, adding:

We’ll do that responsibly over time, continuing to reduce our borrowing. And we’ll do it by growing the economy, taking advantage of our Brexit freedoms, and getting our businesses to invest more and innovate more through the tax reforms that I’m going to put in place.

The shadow levelling up secretary, Lisa Nandy, has attended BT workers’ picket line despite Keir Starmer’s ban on frontbenchers supporting strikes.

Nandy was photographed at a Communication Workers’ Union (CWU) picket line in her constituency, days after Starmer sacked Sam Tarry as a shadow transport minister for doing broadcast interviews from a rail strike picket line – although his presence there was not given as the reason.

As my colleague, Jessica Elgot, points out, one way Labour frontbenchers can potentially navigate Starmer’s policy is to argue that they’re attending the picket line to listen to workers.

Shadow levelling up secretary Lisa Nandy in Wigan today…

A way Labour frontbenchers can potential navigate the picket line ban – they can argue it’s a visit to listen to workers if they don’t hold a placard or do broadcast interviews. But it’s definitely a statement… https://t.co/WNrmyCCfH2

— Jessica Elgot (@jessicaelgot) August 1, 2022

A No 10 spokesperson said Boris Johnson would “definitely” want the Lionesses to receive “the recognition they rightly deserve” after their triumph at the women’s Euros final.

Asked if the PM will support damehoods for the team following their win, Johnson’s official spokesperson added:

On honours specifically, there is obviously a process that is a matter for the independent honours committee, but clearly the public want to see (the) Lionesses receive recognition.

Johnson will be going on holiday from Wednesday until the end of the week, Downing Street added.

Rupert Neate

Rupert Neate

The business secretary, Kwasi Kwarteng, has promised that legislation coming into force on Monday will have an “immediate dissuasive effect on oligarchs attempting to hide their ill-gotten gains, ensuring that the UK is a place for legitimate business only”.

However, a string of lawyers, tax experts, MPs, accountants and transparency campaigners are warning that the long-awaited register of overseas entities, which was sped through parliament after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, is “riddled with flaws and loopholes” and will have no impact on forcing corrupt oligarchs to reveal which UK mansions they own.

The register is intended to, in the government’s words, “flush out corrupt elites laundering money through UK property” by forcing secretive overseas companies to reveal the true owner or risk “tough fines”, or even up to five years in prison.

The Labour MP Margaret Hodge, who has long campaigned for a crackdown on secretive overseas ownership of UK property, complained that the register was “more lead balloon” than the “silver bullet we were promised would stop abuses like money laundering in our real estate sector”.

Read the full article by my colleague Rupert Neate here:





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