December 6, 2022
Trending Tags

New center path to career, training opportunities | West Feliciana

Read Time:3 Minute, 54 Second

Christy Walker’s patient is simulated but the medical and monitoring devices she uses in class are equipment seen and used in hospital settings. Skyler Vickers and Andrew Johnston sit next to a full-size ambulance insert while taking steps to become emergency medical technicians.

These three teenagers are finishing high school and securing career opportunities thanks to the Career and Technical Education Center at West Feliciana Parish High School which opened in August.

Daniel Tutor has been the Career and Technical Education Center coordinator for a little more than a year and he said some of the programs housed in the center include CNA, medical assistant, EMT, welding, construction, agriculture and culinary arts.

“We have a whole medical wing on the other side and we’re getting students certified as CNAs, MA’s EMTs and this — the CNA and MA — is something they can get and immediately get a job and be working,” he said.

Tutor said the medical program students can get jobs in a health care facility or join a staff as a first responder knowing more than basic first aid. “It [EMT] is an advanced class teaching kids how to react during emergencies,” he said. “They can be that person equipped to help other personnel.”

Culinary arts and welding programs are nontraditional in high school settings, but Principal Karoline Taylor said those programs help the school meet the needs of all students, even those not headed to colleges and universities. “Having the center right here on our campus, makes it accessible to all of our students,” she said. “But it is focused more so on our nontraditional students — students who may want to go right into the workforce after high school.”

Taylor is realistic. While many students are college-bound, others are interested in welding, carpentry, electrical and culinary arts. The programs also prepare students to be more self-sufficient as adults.

“I’m going to be purchasing my own house one day,” she said. “So, I want to learn how to repair the electrical work in my house. I want to learn how to do the carpentry work in my house, or I want to learn how to prepare nutritious meals for myself.”

It takes a village to build a viable Career and Technical Education program and school officials are quick to acknowledge the industry partners taking an active role in student career development. “We have very good relationships with our welding partners Brown and Root and a very good relationship with our electrical partner MMR,” Tutor said. “Those are our two longest-standing ones, and they are fantastic. They do all kinds of things for us.”

The newest partner, Moore Industry, signed an agreement to provide carpentry training. In addition, Tutor said the school’s welders get dual enrollment credits through Baton Rouge Community College. “We’re all one entity working toward a common goal, and that’s to get these kids certified and working in those industries,” he said.

Taylor acknowledged there remains a focus on college preparation as well as a very wide vision for each specific student and their needs and goals. “There’s a very wide vision because our students some of our students want to go directly into college after high school and some of our students want to go directly into the workforce,” she said. “And whatever they choose, it’s OK.”

Many career paths don’t include college, but still involve high demand and high-paying jobs that need to be filled. “We’re preparing kids for that and it’s their choice,” Taylor said. “They need to have a choice and they need to be prepared. “Our vision is to prepare those kids for whatever path they choose.”





Source link

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Previous post CGI and Aktia announce strategic business and IT partnership
Next post Gartner Identifies 7 Technology Disruptions That Will Impact Sales Through 2027