October 3, 2022
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Health officials provide recommendations as Miami Valley moves to high COVID-19 risk

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DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – COVID-19 is once again a concern for health leaders as the majority of the counties in the Miami Valley are back under a high community transmission level per the CDC.

The CDC bases high community transmission off of 200 positive cases per 100,000 population along with COVID-19 hospitalizations.

“We’ve seen definitely an appreciable increase in the number of confirmed COVID 19 cases in the last couple of weeks, and in fact, now our community transmission is high,” Clark County Combined Health District Communications Coordinator Nate Smith said.

Miami County Public Health Director of Community Services Nate Bednar said it’s likely this recent surge is due to an increase in summer gatherings, like Fourth of July.

“Any time there’s a large group of people getting together nationwide, statewide, countywide, that’s, you know, whenever there’s that proximity that that there’s a possibility of greater transmission, get more cases,” Bednar said.

After more than two years of dealing with the ups and downs of COVID-19, these health officials know the community is familiar with the recommendations:

  • Stay up-to-date on your COVID-19 vaccinations and boosters
  • Wear a mask in crowded settings
  • Get tested if you feel sick.

These health officials said even the smallest of steps can make a difference in cutting down transmission.

“If you’re not inclined to wear a mask, if you’re not inclined to get vaccinated, is to really just stay home if you’re sick,” Smith said. “If you’re not feeling well, don’t try to do something that you’re not able or feeling up to do.”

“Just be conscious of others, and, you know, let’s let’s do that for our community,” Bednar said. “At least get the vaccine if you’re if you can do that. And then, of course, if you can if you’re able to be aware of your symptoms and just don’t pass that virus on to the next person.”

The CDC updates the community risk map every Thursday.



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