August 17, 2022
Trending Tags

General Brown Weekend brings the ‘nostalgia’ | Arts and Entertainment

Read Time:2 Minute, 7 Second


BROWNVILLE — The General Brown Weekend returned for its 42nd edition packed with vendors, food trucks and carnival rides.

It’s the first General Brown Weekend since the COVID-19 pandemic began.

Daniel J. Connor, a lifelong Brownville resident, is technically president of the General Brown Weekend Committee, but he stresses that it’s a team effort with volunteers. There are 13 members on the planning committee, and they organized about 42 vendor booths and a food court, carnival rides, soapbox racing and much more.

The vendors pay a $40 fee to set up shop all weekend. The food trucks pay $50 to be there, and they share 15% of their profits with the village only if they have a successful weekend. That percentage deal is really just a promise. There’s no binding contract, Mr. Connor said.







General Brown fest makes some noise

Vendors set up shop in the front lawn of the General Brown Mansion, 216 Brown Blvd., Saturday at the General Brown Weekend festival in Brownville. Kara Dry/Watertown Daily Times




“We wanted it set up where if they win, we win,” Mr. Connor said. “And if it’s a wash-out, we’re not hitting anyone hard.”

The festivities continue today with a craft fair, a chicken barbecue at the Brownville American Legion, music and soapbox racing.

Mr. Connor’s favorite part of the weekend is the parade, which started at 7 p.m. Saturday.

“Our parade, when it comes through, this whole town shuts down,” he said. “For a little village, the population triples for one evening. It’s insane and just the coolest thing.”

The parade started at the Brownville-Glen Park Elementary School and ended at the mansion of War of 1812 General Jacob Jennings Brown, the village namesake.







General Brown fest makes some noise

A crowd gathers as the Original Yanks Drum and Bugle Corps, of Antwerp, performs in front of the General Brown Mansion, 216 Brown Blvd., Saturday at the General Brown Weekend festival in Brownville. Kara Dry/Watertown Daily Times




“It’s just that nostalgia, that feeling,” Mr. Connor said. “You come around the corner and it’s starting to get a little dark. You see the rides lit up and the food court lit up. The bands are playing. And then the fireworks show goes off. You don’t get that more classic, old-school carnival feeling.”

“I was born and raised here,” he added. “If things go right, I will die an old man in Brownville.”

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.





Source link

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Previous post Mike Trout In Worst Slump Of His Career Right Now
Next post Prince William hails Queen Elizabeth’s commitment to the environment | Entertainment