December 1, 2022
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First responders bring awareness to mental health using an Omaha firefighter’s own battle

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UP THEIR SHOES TO BRING AWARENESS TO MENTAL HEALTH. THIS MORNING’S NOT FORGOTTEN 5K MEMORIAL RUN REMEMBER AS AN OMAHA FIREFIGHTER AND HIS FIGHT WITH PTSD KETV NEWSWATCH SEVENS, KAYLEE SEARCY HAS OUR STORY. IF THE SOUND OF THE ALMAR RUNNERS TOOK OFF SPRINTINGOR F A CAUSE TO REMEMBER FRIEND JEREMY TNO ARVAAD HE WAS A FRIEND IN FAMILY MEMBER TO SO MANYN O THE IMPACTED TMHE NOT WAS AN ENGINEER WITH THE OMAHA FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR 12 YEARS FIGHTING HIS OWN MENTAL HEALTH BATTLE WITHTSD P BEFORE ANSWERING HIS LAST CALL IN 2019 A LOT OF TIMES. THAT’S FIRST RESPONDERS. WE DON’T PRIORIZETI MENTAL HEALTH, SO THIS ENTVE IS JUST REMINDER THAT THAT’S FIRST RESPONDERS WE DO NEED TO TAKE A LOOK AT OUR MENTAL HEAHLT AND MAKE SURE THAT WE ARE DOING OKAY USING THE FIRST NOT GOTTEN MEMORIAL RUN TO ENSURE OTHERS DON’T SUFFER IN SILENCE SOME WE DEALIT WH EVERY DAY, AND IT’S NOT JUST FROM FIRST RESPOERS,ND BUT IT’S LIMITARY PEOPLE IS PEOPLE THAT SERVICE ORIENDTE INDUSTRIES. ALL ORGANIZATIONS ARE SEEING THE RISE IN SOME OF THESE ISSUES SUPPORRTE AND BATTALION CHIEF ROB GOTCH SAYS SOMETIMES SCIENCE ARE THERE WE SEE SOME THINGS WHERE PEOPLE ARE STRUGGLING AND IT’S EASY TO CONONTFR AND START ASKING QUESTIONS AND THEN TO ENCOURAGE THEM TO GET HELP BUT THAT’S NOT ALWAYS THE CASE FOR EVERYONE BUT IT’S SOME OF THOSE THAT ARE VERY PRIVATE PEOPLE AND EYTH SEE MAYBE THAT IS A SIGN OF WEAKNESS OR THAT IT’S NOT OUR RESPONSIBILITY OR THAT I’LL DEAL WITH IT MYSELF. GOTCH SAYS LEIF CAN BE A CHALLENGE. SO IF YOU’RE STRUGGLING HELP IS OUT THE AREND THINGS CAN KIND OF SPIRAL OUT OF CONTROL AT TIMES AND WE WANT PEOPLE IT HELP IF THEY NEED HELP AND THAT’S WHERE WE’RE T

First responders bring awareness to mental health using an Omaha firefighter’s own battle

The community laced up their shoes in support of mental health awareness and remembering an Omaha firefighter’s own fight with PTSD.

At the sound of the alarm, runners took off, sprinting for a cause. “To remember, Jeremy Knott, he was a dedicated firefighter. He was a friend and family member to so many, he impacted them,” said friend and colleague, RaShad Dacus.Knott was an engineer with the Omaha Fire Department for 12 years, fighting his own mental health battle with PTSD, answering his last call in 2019. “A lot of times as first responders, we don’t prioritize our mental health. So this is just a reminder that as first responders, we do need to take a look at our mental health and make sure that we’re doing okay,” Dacus said. Using the first, “Knott Forgotten Memorial Run,” to ensure others aren’t suffering in silence. “It’s something we deal with every day. And it’s not just first responders, but it’s military people. It’s people in service-oriented industries, all organizations are seeing the rise in some of these issues,” Battalion Chief Robb Gottsch said. He said sometimes the signs are there. “We see some things where people are struggling, and it’s easy to confront and start asking questions, and then to encourage them to get help,” he said.But that’s not always the case for everyone. “It’s some of those that are very private people may see maybe that as a sign of weakness, or that it’s not our responsibility, or that I’ll deal with it myself,” Gottsch said. He said life can be a challenge, so if you’re struggling, help is out there. “And things can kind of spiral out of control at times, and we want people to get help if they need help. And that’s what we’re there for,” Gottsch said. All proceeds for the memorial run are going to the First Responders Foundation, to aid in mental health support.

At the sound of the alarm, runners took off, sprinting for a cause.

“To remember, Jeremy Knott, he was a dedicated firefighter. He was a friend and family member to so many, he impacted them,” said friend and colleague, RaShad Dacus.

Knott was an engineer with the Omaha Fire Department for 12 years, fighting his own mental health battle with PTSD, answering his last call in 2019.

“A lot of times as first responders, we don’t prioritize our mental health. So this is just a reminder that as first responders, we do need to take a look at our mental health and make sure that we’re doing okay,” Dacus said.

Using the first, “Knott Forgotten Memorial Run,” to ensure others aren’t suffering in silence.

“It’s something we deal with every day. And it’s not just first responders, but it’s military people. It’s people in service-oriented industries, all organizations are seeing the rise in some of these issues,” Battalion Chief Robb Gottsch said.

He said sometimes the signs are there.

“We see some things where people are struggling, and it’s easy to confront and start asking questions, and then to encourage them to get help,” he said.

But that’s not always the case for everyone.

“It’s some of those that are very private people may see maybe that as a sign of weakness, or that it’s not our responsibility, or that I’ll deal with it myself,” Gottsch said.

He said life can be a challenge, so if you’re struggling, help is out there.

“And things can kind of spiral out of control at times, and we want people to get help if they need help. And that’s what we’re there for,” Gottsch said.

All proceeds for the memorial run are going to the First Responders Foundation, to aid in mental health support.



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