October 2, 2022

CPS educators learn about career opportunities available for graduates

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Megan Cram, right, a registered nurse at MU Health Care, demonstrates a Viking patient lift Wednesday for Columbia Public Schools educators who were attending the Show-Me Careers Educator Experience at the MU Health Care Learning Center on Lemone Industrial Road. The educators participated in the course to obtain knowledge in health care that they can pass on to their students who might be interested in going into health care after graduation.

Columbia Public Schools teachers, administrators and counselors this week are learning about careers in Columbia, so they can tell their students about options when they graduate from high school.

The Columbia Chamber of Commerce is presenting the Show-Me Careers Educator Experience, in cooperation with the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry.

Previously the Missouri chamber has offered the program in southeast Missouri, St. Louis and Kansas City, but this is the first time it’s being offered in Columbia, said Brian Crouse, vice president of education for the chamber.

The group on Wednesday was at the University of Missouri Health Care Learning Center, where they participated in simulations of CPR, labor and delivery, and respiratory therapy.

The program will place her at an advantage when talking with students about careers, said Molly Pozel, an English teacher at Battle High School.

“I will be better able to talk to students about local industry,” Pozel said.

She can encourage students to attend college if that’s what they need for their careers, or can point to other options where less than a four-year degree is required, she said.

Battle High School Assistant Principal Aly Galbreath, left, and teacher Molly Pozel perform CPR and artificial ventilation Wednesday on a mannequin at the Show-Me Careers Educator Experience at the MU Health Care Learning Center on Lemone Industrial Road.

On Tuesday, the participating educators visited the MU Research Reactor.

“The nuclear reactor is a mystery and I cannot stop talking to people about it,” Pozel said.

Battle Principal Adam Taylor said though he was born and raised in Columbia, he had never visited the research reactor.

The program is great to experience, Taylor said. Teachers will learn valuable information they can provide to students seeking career advice.



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