September 28, 2022
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Aaron Simmons’ legendary UWSP career comes to an end

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CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa. (WSAW) -When it comes to the 2022 UW-Stevens Point Pointers baseball team, you can’t talk about the team without mentioning Aaron Simmons.

The senior’s career came to an end with UWSP’s 5-2 loss to Salisbury at the College World Series on Monday, but he went out with a bang this season: A program 22 home runs, countless other monster offensive stats, and the heart of the Pointers’ fearsome lineup.

“I gave it my all,” said Simmons after the loss. “And I’m just so proud of those guys for doing it for me.”

As Simmons walked off the field for the last time as a Pointer, he soaked it all in as much as possible.

“Not a lot of words were thought of, just so happy to be here,” Simmons said. “We worked out buts off for this moment.”

Simmons finishes his career with the most home runs in a single season in program history, the most triples by any WIAC player ever, the most total bases as a Pointer, and more.

“I knew we had some talent when I came in,” said head coach Nat Richter. “I didn’t think he’d explode like he did the last two years.”

“I mean, the guys call me a beast for a reason,” said Simmons bluntly. “I mean, the amount of work that I do shows.”

In Simmons’ second year in 2019, the team won 14 games.

This year, the Pointers set a program record with 42 victories.

“Just to be that guy that kind of led the way for these guys means a lot,” said Simmons. “And I’m just kind of proud of them, and how they reacted around it.”

Simmons had very special words for his parents, who hand out jolly ranchers every time a Pointer hits a home run. He also had a very special thank you Richter.

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